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August 15, 2010

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My husband gets nasty calls every day because he works for a shop as a customers' service man. He found out by "taming" them -- patiently finding out about their problems, giving them room to talk and making very clear what he can do for them and what not -- that often they end up apologizing like mad and being nicer than someone who started out with a sensible approach. Nastiness sometimes expresses a hidden need, in the case of this nasty mail to your address, badly veiled by envy.

I can only reiterate what others have said re the unpleasant emails re Slow Cloth - sadly there are folk who won't allow that others are altruistic and honest in their intent. I love the idea of Slow Cloth, over the last year returning to my first love of textiles - and that was mostly down to you and your ideas of Slow Cloth and Jude Hill - I am a quiet member of the Facebook Group but am nevertheless deeply grateful for its existence.

Allways and ever there will be nasty people. Mostly out of jealousy.
Try to ignore them.
I'm with you and slow cloth from the start and i will stay.........and try to contribute more often.
XXXm

What a shame that people feel the need to be nasty. It's like those people who complain about TV or films they don't approve of, I think they forget about the OFF button! Don't take part if you have problems of any kind with the group.
Been busy updating my sites and linking various web presences so have not visited the group for a while, but I too appreciate the work you and everyone puts into the group. Thank you.

Thank you Bobbi, they are indeed, and you don't need to apologize for anything! I really appreciate your kind words. I had a tough weekend and your nice comment (and Sandra's too) is very uplifting. Thank you.

I hope the nasty emails are in the tiny minority...I appreciate your hard work and am sorry I don't contribute more often.

Hi Sandra, thank you so much for your support. Yes, I've had quite a few nasty e-mails, but this one was particularly unpleasant, and I regretfully engaged with her instead of just ignoring it. But onward we go. Thanks again for reading, for being here, and for your kind message.

Sorry, that should have been Facebook and not Yahoo group.
My apologies.

I'm sitting here, shaking my head over your nasty e-mail. Why is it some folks feel the need to be nasty? Isn't life kick butt nasty enough? Apparently not...sigh.
But thanks for mentioning the Yahoo group; I'd like to join, learn and eventually share.

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10 Qualities of Slow Cloth, by Elaine Lipson

  • I defined Slow Cloth several years ago on this blog. Read the original post at http://lainie.typepad.com/redthread/2008/01/this-must-be-th-1.html. (Copyright Elaine Lipson 2007-2011; all rights reserved).
  • Joy
    Slow Cloth has the possibility of joy in the process. In other words, the journey matters as much as the destination.
  • Contemplation
    Slow Cloth offers the quality of meditation or contemplation in the process.
  • Skill
    Slow Cloth involves skill and has the possibility of mastery.
  • Diversity
    Slow Cloth acknowledges the rich diversity and multicultural history of textile art.
  • Teaching
    Slow Cloth honors its teachers and lineage even in its most contemporary expressions.
  • Materials
    Slow Cloth is thoughtful in its use of materials and respects their source.
  • Quality
    Slow Cloth artists, designers, crafters and artisans want to make things that last and are well-made.
  • Beauty
    It's in the eye of the beholder, yes, but it's in our nature to reach for beauty and create it where we can.
  • Community
    Slow Cloth supports community by sharing knowledge and respecting relationships.
  • Expression
    Slow Cloth is expressive of individuals and/or cultures. The human creative force is reflected and evident in the work.

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